ESPN 51th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2018


 
Serum and urinary CD80 concentrations in children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome
ELżBIETA KUźMA-MROCZKOWSKA 1 HANNA SZYMANIK-GRZELAK 1 PIOTR SKRZYPCZYK 1 ANNA STELMASZCZYK-EMMEL 2 ELżBIETA GóRSKA 2 MAłGORZATA PAńCZYK-TOMASZEWSKA 1

1- DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS AND NEPHROLOGY, MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF WARSAW
2- DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENTAL AGE, MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF WARSAW
 
Introduction:

Aim of the study was to assess clinical usefulness of evaluation of serum and urinary CD80 concentrations in patients with steroid-sensitive nphrotic syndrome.

Material and methods:

 Twenty children (age 6.75±3.31 years) with steroid sensitive-nephrotic syndrome (NS) were qualified into this prospective study. Following parameters were evaluated in all patients during relapse and remission: in serum: CD80, creatinine, total protein, albumin, total cholesterol, in urine: CD80, creatinine, total protein, and albumin concentrations. All patients were treated with corticosteroids according to KDIGO guidelines. Control group consisted of ten healthy children aged 5.99±2.33 years.  

Results:

 Serum CD80 concentration in children with NS during relapse was significantly lower than CD80 concentration in control group. Additionally, in children with NS serum CD80 was significantly lower in remission compared to concentration in relapse. In 4 children with NS CD80 was absent in urine in both relapse and remission. In remaining 16 children with NS urinary CD80 excretion expressed as CD80-to-creatinine ratio was significantly higher in relapse compared to remission and compared to control group. Children with NS in whom urinary C80 was not detected in relapse were older and were treated with significantly higher prednisone doses. In 20 children with NS negative correlation between urinary CD80-to-creatinine ratio in relapse and prednisone dose was found (r = -0.46, p<0.05). However, there was no difference in urinary CD80-to-creatinine ratio between children with NS treated and not treated with prednisone at the moment of relapse. 

Conclusions:

1.      Absence of CD80 in urine may suggest worse clinical course of nephrotic syndrome.

2.      The influence of prednisone treatment on urinary CD80 excretion requires further examinations.