ESPN 51th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2018


 
Assessment of Children with Primary Monosymptomatic Enuresis in Terms of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Changes
HILAL MERTEK 1 DEMET ALAYGUT 2 EREN SOYALTIN 2 CANER ALPARSLAN 2 SEÇIL ARSLANSOYU ÇAMLAR 2 FATMA MUTLUBAS 2 ÖNDER YAVASCAN 2 BELDE KASAP DEMIR 3

1- IZMIR TEPECIK TRAINING AND RESEARCH HOSPITAL, DIVISION OF PEDIATRICS
2- IZMIR TEPECIK TRAINING AND RESEARCH HOSPITAL, PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY CLINIC, IZMIR , TURKEY
3- IZMIR KATIP CELEBI UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY AND RHEUMATOLOGY
 
Introduction:

 In this study, the relationship between blood pressure changes and urinary incontinence was investigated by 24 hour blood pressure measurement in children with enuresis.

Material and methods:

 A group of children with primary monosymptomatic enuresis between the ages of 5 and 18 who applied to the pediatric  nephrology and general pediatrics clinic between January – June 2017 formed the patient group (Group 1) Children of similar age and children without enuresis constituted the control group (Group 2)  Demographic informations, height, body weight, body mass index, family history of chronic illnesses, family history of enuresis, drug use, laboratory tests (blood biochemistry and whole blood count) and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) measurements were compared.

Results:

 35 patients (62.5%, group 1) and 21 control groups (37.5%, group 2) were included in the study. There was a difference in age (p=0,040), height (p=0,031)  and weight (p=0,042) between the two groups. When patients past history and family history data were evaluated, the presence of enuresis story in the family was statistically significant in patients groups (p=0,001). There was no statistically significant difference ABPM data of both groups.

Conclusions:

 As a result, there are very different study results on the autonomic system changes in enuretic patients and their reflection on blood pressure. The results for the 24-hour blood pressure profiles that are generally made for this are also quite different. There are both supportive and unsupportive views on the idea that urine production is due to circadian rhythm and that concomitant BP depression is accompanied by a decrease in the production during sleep. For this reason, there is a need for work to be done in larger groups of patients.