ESPN 51th Annual Meeting

ESPN 2018


 
THE ROLE OF ZINC IN CHIDREN WITH RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTION
Yüksel Hakan Aydoğmuş 1 Aslı Çelebi Tayfur 2 Koza Murat 3 Aysun Çaltık Yılmaz 2 Bahar Büyükkaragöz 2 Sibel Tekgündüz 4 Sacit Günbey 1

1- UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES, KEÇIÖREN TRAINING AND RESEARCH HOSPITAL, DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS
2- UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES, KEÇIÖREN TRAINING AND RESEARCH HOSPITAL, DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY
3- UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES, KEÇIÖREN TRAINING AND RESEARCH HOSPITAL, DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY
4- UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES, KEÇIÖREN TRAINING AND RESEARCH HOSPITAL, DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY AND ONCOLOGY
 
Introduction:

 The aim of this study was to examine the role of zinc in recurrent UTI etiology in children and to determine if abnormal zinc status in the body is a risk factor for lower and/or upper urinary tract infections (UTI).   

Material and methods:

Thirty-three patients, aged between 4 and 16.5 years with recurrent UTI who were free of UTI within the previous 1 month; who did not receive zinc support within the previous 6 months; who had no dysfunctional voiding disorder, urolithiasis, anatomic disorder of the urinary tract were included in the study group. The control group comprised 33 healthy children, aged between 4 and 17,5 years who did not  receive zinc support within the previous 6 months. The children with recurrent UTI were subgrouped into upper UTI or lower UTI groups according to their previous medical history. The serum and  urinary zinc levels of patients and healthy children were measured using the colorimetric method and compared. 

Results:

The serum zinc levels of both groups were low. There was no statistically significant difference for serum zinc level and urinary zinc/creatinine ratio between children with recurrent UTI and healthy controls nor between children with lower UTI and children with upper UTI. The mean serum zinc level was higher and mean urine zinc/creatinine ratio was lower in healthy group. No correlation was found between body mass index scores and serum zinc levels nor between BMI scores and urine zinc/creatinine ratios in children with recurrent UTI.

Conclusions:

We suggest that low serum zinc levels in the children with recurrent UTI and healthy children were related to the dietary intake of the children. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of oral zinc supplementation as an adjunctive therapy in addition to other preventive measures may be more informative to understand the role of zinc in recurrent UTI etiology in children.